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Home World Mookie Blaylock: charged with vehicular homicide, held without bond for May 31 crash

Mookie Blaylock: charged with vehicular homicide, held without bond for May 31 crash

Mookie Blaylock: charged with vehicular homicide, held without bond for May 31 crash, Amidst the typical rumblings of the NBA postseason, the most shocking basketball-related news of the past several weeks has been the horrific car crash that sent retired All-Star point guard Mookie Blaylock into critical condition and caused the death of 43-year-old Monica Murphy. The details of the crash have been vague, with Blaylock's SUV crossing the median and striking a van in a head-on collision.

Thankfully, Blaylock is now out of the hospital. Unfortunately, the circumstances and fallout of the crash have become much darker. From The Associated Press:

Former NBA All-Star Daron ''Mookie'' Blaylock is out of the hospital and in jail, charged with vehicular homicide in a car crash south of Atlanta.

Blaylock is also charged with driving on a suspended license, making an improper lane change and crossing the median in the head-on crash that killed a 43-year-old woman in Jonesboro on May 31. Blaylock surrendered Monday and is being held without bond.

Blaylock's attorney has said the former player blacked out just before the crash. Authorities have said Blaylock was also wanted elsewhere for failing to appear in court on a DUI charge.

A charge is not a verdict, so we should not assume the worst of Blaylock in this case. However, the crash now appears as if it could be part of a pattern, not just an isolated incident. If things head to a trial, it's possible that more negative details will come out.

Georgia law involves two degrees of homicide by vehicle, neither of which requires intent to kill. It is not clear which charge Blaylock faces.

The news that Blaylock has partially recovered from his injuries is a good thing — the death of Monica Murphy has already made this crash extremely tragic. However, it looks like his improved health will be the beginning of a long process, not a conclusion.

Mookie Blaylock: charged with vehicular homicide, held without bond for May 31 crash, Amidst the typical rumblings of the NBA postseason, the most shocking basketball-related news of the past several weeks has been the horrific car crash that sent retired All-Star point guard Mookie Blaylock into critical condition and caused the death of 43-year-old Monica Murphy. The details of the crash have been vague, with Blaylock's SUV crossing the median and striking a van in a head-on collision.

Thankfully, Blaylock is now out of the hospital. Unfortunately, the circumstances and fallout of the crash have become much darker. From The Associated Press:

Former NBA All-Star Daron ''Mookie'' Blaylock is out of the hospital and in jail, charged with vehicular homicide in a car crash south of Atlanta.

Blaylock is also charged with driving on a suspended license, making an improper lane change and crossing the median in the head-on crash that killed a 43-year-old woman in Jonesboro on May 31. Blaylock surrendered Monday and is being held without bond.

Blaylock's attorney has said the former player blacked out just before the crash. Authorities have said Blaylock was also wanted elsewhere for failing to appear in court on a DUI charge.

A charge is not a verdict, so we should not assume the worst of Blaylock in this case. However, the crash now appears as if it could be part of a pattern, not just an isolated incident. If things head to a trial, it's possible that more negative details will come out.

Georgia law involves two degrees of homicide by vehicle, neither of which requires intent to kill. It is not clear which charge Blaylock faces.

The news that Blaylock has partially recovered from his injuries is a good thing — the death of Monica Murphy has already made this crash extremely tragic. However, it looks like his improved health will be the beginning of a long process, not a conclusion.

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